Copertina del podcast

Astronomy Daily - The Podcast

  • S03E84: NASA's Spacewalk Halt & SpaceX's Launch Marathon

    25 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy Daily, your daily dose of celestial wonder and cosmic news. I'm Anna, your host, and I'm thrilled to take you on today's journey through the fascinating world of astronomy. In our podcast, we bring you the latest updates, expert insights, and detailed commentary on everything happening beyond our planet. Today we've got an exciting lineup of stories that will captivate both seasoned astronomers and curious newcomers alike. We'll start with NASA's recent decision to cancel a spacewalk again due to a coolant leak. What happened, why it's significant and what it means for future missions. Then we'll dive into a busy week of launches by SpaceX and JAXA, highlighting their challenges and achievements. We'll also explore China's Chang'e-6 mission, returning with groundbreaking samples from the moon's far side. We'll examine the close approach of two large asteroids as they fly by Earth and talk about why it's crucial to enhance our detection systems. Ever wondered why some planets have moons while others don't? We'll delve into the science behind it, and later we'll uncover the mystery behind a massive aurora in the arctic sky. So sit back, relax, and let's embark on this cosmic journey together. 00:00 Welcome to Astronomy Daily, your daily dose of celestial wonder and cosmic news 01:10 NASA calls off a spacewalk due to a leak in an astronaut spacesuit 03:12 After delays due to tropical storm Alberto, SpaceX has several upcoming launches scheduled 05:09 Japan gearing up for third launch attempt of h three rocket on June 30 06:18 The Chang'e six mission is set to return with samples from the far side 08:28 Two large asteroids will pass by Earth this week coinciding with Asteroid day 10:47 Understanding why planets have moons or don't is a complex puzzle 13:51 December 2022 aurora was unusually smooth and broad 16:26 Today's Episode Wrap https://www.astronomydaily.io https://www.bitesz.com
    Ascoltato 17 min. 34 sec.
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    S03E84 Plus: NASA's Spacewalk Halt & SpaceX's Launch Marathon

    25 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy Daily, your daily dose of celestial wonder and cosmic news. I'm Anna, your host, and I'm thrilled to take you on today's journey through the fascinating world of astronomy. In our podcast, we bring you the latest updates, expert insights, and detailed commentary on everything happening beyond our planet. Today we've got an exciting lineup of stories that will captivate both seasoned astronomers and curious newcomers alike. We'll start with NASA's recent decision to cancel a spacewalk again due to a coolant leak. What happened, why it's significant and what it means for future missions. Then we'll dive into a busy week of launches by SpaceX and JAXA, highlighting their challenges and achievements. We'll also explore China's Chang'e-6 mission, returning with groundbreaking samples from the moon's far side. We'll examine the close approach of two large asteroids as they fly by Earth and talk about why it's crucial to enhance our detection systems. Ever wondered why some planets have moons while others don't? We'll delve into the science behind it, and later we'll uncover the mystery behind a massive aurora in the arctic sky. So sit back, relax, and let's embark on this cosmic journey together. 00:00 Welcome to Astronomy Daily, your daily dose of celestial wonder and cosmic news 01:10 NASA calls off a spacewalk due to a leak in an astronaut spacesuit 03:12 After delays due to tropical storm Alberto, SpaceX has several upcoming launches scheduled 05:09 Japan gearing up for third launch attempt of h three rocket on June 30 06:18 The Chang'e six mission is set to return with samples from the far side 08:28 Two large asteroids will pass by Earth this week coinciding with Asteroid day 10:47 Understanding why planets have moons or don't is a complex puzzle 13:51 December 2022 aurora was unusually smooth and broad 16:26 Today's Episode Wrap https://www.astronomydaily.io https://www.bitesz.com
    Riproduci
  • S03E83: NASA Sued Over Space Junk & Gamma Ray Burst Hunt

    24 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy AstroDailyPod! I'm your host, Steve Dunkley, bringing you the latest cosmic updates for 24 June 2024. Today, we delve into a star on the brink of explosion, a stranded spacecraft, and the ongoing search for Planet Nine. We'll also explore new satellite constellations aiding in firefighting, a joint Chinese-French satellite mission, and a family suing NASA over space debris. Plus, we look at racing drones testing spacecraft control systems. Let's dive in!- **NASA Sued Over Space Junk**: An American family is claiming over $80,000 from NASA after space debris crashed into their Florida home. The debris, part of a cargo pallet from the ISS, caused significant damage but fortunately no injuries. NASA's response could set a precedent for future claims.- **Chinese-French Satellite Mission**: A joint mission between China and France has launched the Space Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) to study gamma ray bursts, the universe's mightiest explosions. This collaboration aims to unravel mysteries of the cosmos and enhance our understanding of the universe's history.- **Boeing Starliner Delayed Again**: NASA has delayed the return of the Boeing Starliner from the ISS to review thruster malfunctions and helium leaks. The mission, initially set for June 26, will be rescheduled to ensure safety and thorough data analysis.- **Impending Nova Event**: The star T Coronae Borealis, part of a binary system, is set to undergo a nova event visible from Earth. This rare cosmic event offers a unique opportunity for both professional and amateur astronomers to observe and study.- **Racing Drones for Spacecraft Control**: Researchers at Delft University are using racing drones to test neural network-based AI control systems for future space missions. This innovative approach aims to enhance spacecraft autonomy and efficiency in unpredictable space environments. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at [astronomydaily.io](https://www.astronomydaily.io) for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Steve, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all!**Support**:This podcast is better with your support:[https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/](https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/)[www.bitesz.com](https://www.bitesz.com/)**Sponsors**:[www.bitesz.com/nordpass](https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass)[https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/]
    Ascoltato 17 min. 37 sec.
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    S03E83 Plus: NASA Sued Over Space Junk & Gamma Ray Burst Hunt

    24 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy AstroDailyPod! I'm your host, Steve Dunkley, bringing you the latest cosmic updates for 24 June 2024. Today, we delve into a star on the brink of explosion, a stranded spacecraft, and the ongoing search for Planet Nine. We'll also explore new satellite constellations aiding in firefighting, a joint Chinese-French satellite mission, and a family suing NASA over space debris. Plus, we look at racing drones testing spacecraft control systems. Let's dive in!- **NASA Sued Over Space Junk**: An American family is claiming over $80,000 from NASA after space debris crashed into their Florida home. The debris, part of a cargo pallet from the ISS, caused significant damage but fortunately no injuries. NASA's response could set a precedent for future claims.- **Chinese-French Satellite Mission**: A joint mission between China and France has launched the Space Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) to study gamma ray bursts, the universe's mightiest explosions. This collaboration aims to unravel mysteries of the cosmos and enhance our understanding of the universe's history.- **Boeing Starliner Delayed Again**: NASA has delayed the return of the Boeing Starliner from the ISS to review thruster malfunctions and helium leaks. The mission, initially set for June 26, will be rescheduled to ensure safety and thorough data analysis.- **Impending Nova Event**: The star T Coronae Borealis, part of a binary system, is set to undergo a nova event visible from Earth. This rare cosmic event offers a unique opportunity for both professional and amateur astronomers to observe and study.- **Racing Drones for Spacecraft Control**: Researchers at Delft University are using racing drones to test neural network-based AI control systems for future space missions. This innovative approach aims to enhance spacecraft autonomy and efficiency in unpredictable space environments.For an astronomical experience, visit our website at [astronomydaily.io](https://www.astronomydaily.io) for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Steve, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all!**Support**:This podcast is better with your support:[https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/](https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/)[www.bitesz.com](https://www.bitesz.com/)**Sponsors**:[www.bitesz.com/nordpass](https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass)[https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/]
    Riproduci
  • S03E82: Boeing's Starliner Delay (Again) & Saturn's Seasonal Mysteries

    22 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy Daily. I'm your host, Anna, and today we've got an exciting lineup of space news you won't want to miss. From the latest updates on Boeing's Starliner mission to groundbreaking discoveries about our galaxy's star clusters and intriguing insights into changes occurring within Earth's inner core. We've also got news on Virgin Galactic's new commercial astronaut crew, the completion of the Ariane 6 rocket's final rehearsal, and revelations from NASA's Cassini spacecraft about Saturn's seasonal heat and storms. So sit back, relax, and let's dive into the cosmos. Chapters- Boeing's Starliner Mission Delay: The first astronaut mission of Boeing's Starliner capsule has been delayed until at least July 2. Originally set to undock from the International Space Station on June 26, the mission has been extended to allow NASA and Boeing more time to assess several issues that have emerged. - Origins of Star Clusters: Astronomers from the University of Vienna have traced the origins of nearby star clusters to three primary star-forming regions in our Milky Way galaxy. These regions have been sites of massive star formation and subsequent supernova explosions. - Earth's Inner Core Slowing Down: Since around 2010, researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that Earth's inner core has been slowing down. This phenomenon, which alters the length of our days by fractions of a second, offers intriguing insights into the planet's internal dynamics. - Virgin Galactic's New Commercial Astronaut Crew: Virgin Galactic has revealed a new commercial astronaut crew for its next-generation delta class planes, which are slated to commence flights in 2026. This pioneering crew features three notable members: past Virgin Galactic astronaut Kelly Girardi, Canadian Shawna Pandya, and Ireland's Nora Patton. - Ariane 6 Rocket's Final Rehearsal: The first Ariane 6 rocket has successfully completed its final wet dress rehearsal, marking an important milestone before its first skyward journey. This crucial test took place at Europe's spaceport in French Guiana. - NASA's Cassini Spacecraft Findings: NASA's Cassini spacecraft has provided us with groundbreaking data that reveals Saturn emits heat in varying amounts depending on its seasons. This fascinating discovery outlines that Saturn fluctuates in the amount of heat it radiates into space. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at astronomydaily.io for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Anna, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all! Support:This podcast is better with your support: https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/ https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/
    Ascoltato 9 min. 31 sec.
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    S03E82 Plus: Boeing's Starliner Delay (Again) & Saturn's Seasonal Mysteries

    22 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy Daily. I'm your host, Anna, and today we've got an exciting lineup of space news you won't want to miss. From the latest updates on Boeing's Starliner mission to groundbreaking discoveries about our galaxy's star clusters and intriguing insights into changes occurring within Earth's inner core. We've also got news on Virgin Galactic's new commercial astronaut crew, the completion of the Ariane 6 rocket's final rehearsal, and revelations from NASA's Cassini spacecraft about Saturn's seasonal heat and storms. So sit back, relax, and let's dive into the cosmos. Chapters- Boeing's Starliner Mission Delay: The first astronaut mission of Boeing's Starliner capsule has been delayed until at least July 2. Originally set to undock from the International Space Station on June 26, the mission has been extended to allow NASA and Boeing more time to assess several issues that have emerged. - Origins of Star Clusters: Astronomers from the University of Vienna have traced the origins of nearby star clusters to three primary star-forming regions in our Milky Way galaxy. These regions have been sites of massive star formation and subsequent supernova explosions. - Earth's Inner Core Slowing Down: Since around 2010, researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that Earth's inner core has been slowing down. This phenomenon, which alters the length of our days by fractions of a second, offers intriguing insights into the planet's internal dynamics. - Virgin Galactic's New Commercial Astronaut Crew: Virgin Galactic has revealed a new commercial astronaut crew for its next-generation delta class planes, which are slated to commence flights in 2026. This pioneering crew features three notable members: past Virgin Galactic astronaut Kelly Girardi, Canadian Shawna Pandya, and Ireland's Nora Patton. - Ariane 6 Rocket's Final Rehearsal: The first Ariane 6 rocket has successfully completed its final wet dress rehearsal, marking an important milestone before its first skyward journey. This crucial test took place at Europe's spaceport in French Guiana. - NASA's Cassini Spacecraft Findings: NASA's Cassini spacecraft has provided us with groundbreaking data that reveals Saturn emits heat in varying amounts depending on its seasons. This fascinating discovery outlines that Saturn fluctuates in the amount of heat it radiates into space. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at astronomydaily.io for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Anna, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all! Support:This podcast is better with your support: https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/ https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/
    Riproduci
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    S03E81 Plus: NASA's Asteroid Defense & Marsquake Water Discovery

    22 GIU 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with today's episode of Astronomy Daily - The Podcast, where your host, Anna, brings you the latest cosmic updates. We'll delve into NASA's latest asteroid impact exercise, groundbreaking research on Martian water detection, DARPA's new quantum laser project, intriguing air samples gathered by Perseverance, and celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope's 21st anniversary with stunning images. Plus, we'll look at recent research focusing on heart failure in space. Let's dive right in.NASA recently released a summary of the fifth biennial planetary defense interagency tabletop exercise, aimed at exploring our preparedness for potential asteroid threats. Organized by NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office in partnership with FEMA and the US Department of State Office of Space Affairs, this exercise aimed to assess and enhance our national response capabilities. Despite having no significant asteroid impact threats on the horizon, these hypothetical exercises are invaluable, providing insights into potential risks and response strategies for varying scenarios. This year's exercise involved a newly identified asteroid with a 72% chance of hitting Earth in 14 years. Nearly 100 representatives from US government agencies and international collaborators convened at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland for the exercise. The next steps include publishing a complete after-action report detailing the identified strengths and gaps and offering recommendations for improvement.In an exciting development, researchers believe that marsquakes could offer a new method for detecting liquid water deep underground on Mars. This intriguing possibility lies in the unique electromagnetic signals these quakes produce as they traverse Mars' subsurface. Traditional methods, such as ground-penetrating radar used on Earth, aren't effective at the depths where water might exist on Mars. But marsquakes could change that. Researchers at Penn State have modeled the Martian subsurface, incorporating potential aquifers to test the seismoelectric method. Their results are promising. By identifying these unique seismic signals, they could map hidden aquifers, providing critical insights into the presence and properties of water on Mars today.Next, we dive into an exciting breakthrough in laser technology. Funded by DARPA, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, they're investing in a game-changing project to develop a quantum laser that uses entangled photons, promising better precision over long distances and in adverse conditions. Traditional lasers are remarkable tools already crucial in various domains, but they are not without limitations. This is where the new quantum laser comes in, utilizing quantum entanglement to pair photons together, creating photonic dimers. This means that applications such as military surveillance, secure communications, and high-precision mapping could see significant performance improvements.Scientists are eagerly anticipating the return of air samples collected by NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. These samples, gathered in titanium tubes alongside rock and regolith, are providing a golden opportunity to delve deeper into the Martian atmosphere and its composition as part of the Mars Sample Return campaign. These 24 samples will be analyzed to uncover secrets about the planet's atmospheric history and to determine the presence of trace gases that may have been consistent since Mars' ancient past. Understanding this interaction is pivotal, as it could reveal how much water vapor resides near the Martian surface. Such knowledge can illuminate the mysterious ways in which Mars' water cycle has evolved over time.To celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope's 21st anniversary, astronomers pointed Hubble's eye at a striking cosmic duo. Known as Arp 273, this pair of interacting galaxies presents a breathtaking sight. The larger galaxy, UGC 1810, has a disk that has been twisted into a rose-like shape. This stunning distortion is caused by the gravitational tidal forces exerted by its companion, UGC 1813. The image, a composite of observations from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, reveals the intricate beauty and complex dance of these celestial bodies, showcasing the achievements of Hubble and its ongoing contributions to our understanding of the universe.As commercial space travel becomes more accessible, researchers are delving into how spaceflight impacts individuals with underlying health conditions, especially heart failure. Recent studies have focused on developing computational models to predict how microgravity affects these individuals. Heart failure affects over 100 million people globally and is generally categorized into two types. Both types present unique challenges in a microgravity environment, underscoring the need for carefully tailored measures to protect the health of space tourists. Researchers have used advanced computational models to simulate these conditions and predict outcomes with a high degree of accuracy. These models allow scientists to anticipate the specific cardiovascular challenges faced by heart failure patients in space.That wraps up today's episode of Astronomy Daily. Be sure to visit our website at https://www.astronomydaily.io for regularly updated news, and to sign up for our newsletter. Don't forget to follow us on social media by searching for @AstroDailyPod on YouTube Music, X, TikTok, and Facebook. And please subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, or wherever you get your podcasts. This is Anna saying thank you for tuning in, and remember to keep looking up.
    Riproduci
  • S03E81: NASA's Asteroid Defense & Marsquake Water Discovery

    21 GIU 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with today's episode of Astronomy Daily - The Podcast, where your host, Anna, brings you the latest cosmic updates. We'll delve into NASA's latest asteroid impact exercise, groundbreaking research on Martian water detection, DARPA's new quantum laser project, intriguing air samples gathered by Perseverance, and celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope's 21st anniversary with stunning images. Plus, we'll look at recent research focusing on heart failure in space. Let's dive right in.NASA recently released a summary of the fifth biennial planetary defense interagency tabletop exercise, aimed at exploring our preparedness for potential asteroid threats. Organized by NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office in partnership with FEMA and the US Department of State Office of Space Affairs, this exercise aimed to assess and enhance our national response capabilities. Despite having no significant asteroid impact threats on the horizon, these hypothetical exercises are invaluable, providing insights into potential risks and response strategies for varying scenarios. This year's exercise involved a newly identified asteroid with a 72% chance of hitting Earth in 14 years. Nearly 100 representatives from US government agencies and international collaborators convened at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland for the exercise. The next steps include publishing a complete after-action report detailing the identified strengths and gaps and offering recommendations for improvement.In an exciting development, researchers believe that marsquakes could offer a new method for detecting liquid water deep underground on Mars. This intriguing possibility lies in the unique electromagnetic signals these quakes produce as they traverse Mars' subsurface. Traditional methods, such as ground-penetrating radar used on Earth, aren't effective at the depths where water might exist on Mars. But marsquakes could change that. Researchers at Penn State have modeled the Martian subsurface, incorporating potential aquifers to test the seismoelectric method. Their results are promising. By identifying these unique seismic signals, they could map hidden aquifers, providing critical insights into the presence and properties of water on Mars today.Next, we dive into an exciting breakthrough in laser technology. Funded by DARPA, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, they're investing in a game-changing project to develop a quantum laser that uses entangled photons, promising better precision over long distances and in adverse conditions. Traditional lasers are remarkable tools already crucial in various domains, but they are not without limitations. This is where the new quantum laser comes in, utilizing quantum entanglement to pair photons together, creating photonic dimers. This means that applications such as military surveillance, secure communications, and high-precision mapping could see significant performance improvements.Scientists are eagerly anticipating the return of air samples collected by NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. These samples, gathered in titanium tubes alongside rock and regolith, are providing a golden opportunity to delve deeper into the Martian atmosphere and its composition as part of the Mars Sample Return campaign. These 24 samples will be analyzed to uncover secrets about the planet's atmospheric history and to determine the presence of trace gases that may have been consistent since Mars' ancient past. Understanding this interaction is pivotal, as it could reveal how much water vapor resides near the Martian surface. Such knowledge can illuminate the mysterious ways in which Mars' water cycle has evolved over time.To celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope's 21st anniversary, astronomers pointed Hubble's eye at a striking cosmic duo. Known as Arp 273, this pair of interacting galaxies presents a breathtaking sight. The larger galaxy, UGC 1810, has a disk that has been twisted into a rose-like shape. This stunning distortion is caused by the gravitational tidal forces exerted by its companion, UGC 1813. The image, a composite of observations from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, reveals the intricate beauty and complex dance of these celestial bodies, showcasing the achievements of Hubble and its ongoing contributions to our understanding of the universe.As commercial space travel becomes more accessible, researchers are delving into how spaceflight impacts individuals with underlying health conditions, especially heart failure. Recent studies have focused on developing computational models to predict how microgravity affects these individuals. Heart failure affects over 100 million people globally and is generally categorized into two types. Both types present unique challenges in a microgravity environment, underscoring the need for carefully tailored measures to protect the health of space tourists. Researchers have used advanced computational models to simulate these conditions and predict outcomes with a high degree of accuracy. These models allow scientists to anticipate the specific cardiovascular challenges faced by heart failure patients in space.That wraps up today's episode of Astronomy Daily. Be sure to visit our website at https://www.astronomydaily.io for regularly updated news, and to sign up for our newsletter. Don't forget to follow us on social media by searching for @AstroDailyPod on YouTube Music, X, TikTok, and Facebook. And please subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, or wherever you get your podcasts. This is Anna saying thank you for tuning in, and remember to keep looking up. Support: This podcast is better with your support: https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/ https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/
    Ascoltato 16 min. 33 sec.
  • S03E80: Ozone Threat from Space Junk & Lunar Standstill Magic

    20 GIU 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with today's episode of Astronomy Daily - The Podcast, where your host, Anna, brings you the latest cosmic updates. We'll explore the first major lunar standstill in 18 years, unveiling a breathtaking celestial moment you won't want to miss. Next, we'll dive into the rich, metallic landscapes of Mars, painting a vivid picture of the red planet's geological marvels. We'll also tackle the unsettling reality of space junk and its impact on Earth's ozone layer, a concern growing with the expansion of satellite mega constellations. Shifting our gaze to Saturn's moon Titan, we'll uncover how wave activity might be shaping its mysterious coastlines. Finally, we'll explore how cosmic winds driven by supermassive black holes can alter the very fabric of galaxies. And to round it all off, we'll get an update on the latest developments at SpaceX's Starbase. So let's dive right in.This year marks a truly remarkable celestial event, the first major lunar standstill since 2006. This fascinating phenomenon will see the moon rising and setting at its most extreme points on the horizon. For sky watchers, this is a rare treat, occurring only once every 18.6 years. During a major lunar standstill, the tilts of both the Earth and the moon are at their maximum, causing the moon to rise and set at its highest and lowest points in its orbital cycle. To fully appreciate the grandeur of this event, consider the ancient sites of Stonehenge, Kalanish, and Newgrange. These prehistoric monuments are thought to be aligned with the points of moonrise and moonset during such standstills, indicating the historical significance and awe that this event has invoked in humanity for millennia. The next standstill, at its most extreme, will be around the equinoxes in September 2024 and March 2025. For those eager to witness this spectacle, the best times include moonrise at sunset and moonset at sunrise, especially during a full moon. No need for elaborate equipment, just a clear view of the horizon will suffice to observe the moon's dramatic paths. So mark your calendars and be sure to look up. The lunar sky is about to put on a show you won't want to miss.The European Space Agency has recently unveiled a breathtaking image of Mars' Marth Vallis region, highlighting the planet's complex and metallic beauty. This newly captured scene showcases landscapes rich in iron, magnesium, and aluminum, creating a vibrant and rust-colored spectacle that tells a story billions of years in the making. Marth Vallis is particularly significant because it bears evidence of ancient water flow. The region's deeply eroded valleys and mineral-rich layers suggest that liquid water once roamed these Martian plains, potentially creating habitable conditions. This discovery continues to intrigue scientists as understanding the history of water on Mars is crucial for piecing together the planet's potential for supporting life. With ongoing studies and future missions focused on similar areas, we inch closer to unlocking the mysteries of the red planet's wet past and its capacity to host life.A new study has quantified the alarming extent of pollution caused by defunct Internet satellites. Thousands of satellites have been deployed into mega constellations to meet the growing global demand for Internet services. However, when these satellites reach the end of their operational life and re-enter Earth's atmosphere, they disintegrate and release aluminum oxide particles that erode the ozone layer. This phenomenon poses a significant threat to the years of progress made in ozone recovery. The 1987 Montreal Protocol successfully curbed the emission of ozone-depleting substances like CFCs, leading to a shrinking ozone hole over Antarctica, with full recovery expected within the next few decades. But now the unexpected increase in aluminum oxide pollution could derail this positive trend. The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, shows that aluminum oxide particles initiate chemical reactions between ozone and chlorine, leading to sustained ozone depletion. Alarmingly, the number of aluminum oxide particles in the atmosphere has surged eightfold from 2016 to 2022. This spike is set to continue as companies like SpaceX and Amazon plan to launch thousands more satellites. The ongoing and upcoming mega constellations are estimated to significantly elevate aluminum levels in the mesosphere, thereby posing a long-term threat to the stratospheric ozone layer, which shields us from harmful UV radiation. The researchers emphasize the need for immediate attention to this growing issue, advocating for sustainable practices to limit satellite-driven ozone depletion. The results underline the importance of balancing technological advancement with environmental stewardship to ensure our atmosphere remains protective for generations to come.Titan, Saturn's largest moon, features active lakes and seas filled with liquid methane and ethane. These otherworldly bodies of liquid are not only visually compelling but also tell a story of relentless geological activity. Recent simulations by MIT researchers have shed light on how waves might be eroding Titan's coastlines, radically altering our understanding of this mysterious moon. By modeling terrestrial erosion processes and applying them to Titan's unique environment, the researchers determined that wave activity is likely responsible for shaping the moon's shores. This means that shorelines on Titan resemble those formed by waves here on Earth, suggesting a dynamic interplay between the liquid bodies and the wind-driven waves. These discoveries offer invaluable insights into Titan's climate, helping scientists better understand its geological history and atmospheric conditions. If winds are strong enough to drive these waves, they could reveal secrets about Titan's weather patterns and even its potential to support some form of prebiotic chemistry.A groundbreaking study reveals that supermassive black holes are generating powerful cosmic winds, capable of accelerating gas to astonishing speeds of over 10,000 miles/second. These black hole-induced winds don't just ripple through their galaxies, they fundamentally reshape them by either fueling or stifling star formation. These powerful winds can have a dramatic effect on the galaxy's evolution. Imagine a quasar, a supermassive black hole surrounded by a disk of matter being pulled in by the black hole's gravitational force. The friction created as this matter spirals inward heats the disk, emitting intense radiation that can propel gas at unimaginable speeds. This process isn't merely a cosmic spectacle; it serves a critical function in the galactic environment. Depending on the circumstances, these winds can compress gas, leading to the birth of new stars or expel the gas, preventing star formation altogether. Researchers now have a clearer understanding of how these fascinating mechanisms work, thanks to long-term observational data that captured these accelerating gases in action. This transformational insight adds another piece to the puzzle of how black holes interact with and shape their host galaxies, emphasizing the profound impact these cosmic phenomena have on the universe.SpaceX is busy at Starbase preparing for its fifth flight by upgrading its infrastructure, including new office buildings and the construction of a second tower. Recently, Ship 26 conducted its first multi-engine static fire test at the site, marking a significant milestone. These enhancements, which also involve a new test stand, improved tank farms, and the development of Megabay Two, are designed to expedite vehicle testing and future launches. With a new parking garage and updated launch mount systems in place, SpaceX aims to ensure quicker turnarounds and increased safety for its employees and operations. These ongoing upgrades showcase SpaceX's unwavering commitment to pushing the boundaries of space exploration and innovation. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at https://www.astronomydaily.io for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Anna, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all! Support: This podcast is better with your support: https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/ https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/
    Ascoltato 9 min. 4 sec.
  • Supporters Club

    S03E80 Plus: Lunar Standstill Spectacle & Mars' Metallic Marvels

    20 GIU 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with today's episode of Astronomy Daily - The Podcast, where your host, Anna, brings you the latest cosmic updates. We'll explore the first major lunar standstill in 18 years, unveiling a breathtaking celestial moment you won't want to miss. Next, we'll dive into the rich, metallic landscapes of Mars, painting a vivid picture of the red planet's geological marvels. We'll also tackle the unsettling reality of space junk and its impact on Earth's ozone layer, a concern growing with the expansion of satellite mega constellations. Shifting our gaze to Saturn's moon Titan, we'll uncover how wave activity might be shaping its mysterious coastlines. Finally, we'll explore how cosmic winds driven by supermassive black holes can alter the very fabric of galaxies. And to round it all off, we'll get an update on the latest developments at SpaceX's Starbase. So let's dive right in.This year marks a truly remarkable celestial event, the first major lunar standstill since 2006. This fascinating phenomenon will see the moon rising and setting at its most extreme points on the horizon. For sky watchers, this is a rare treat, occurring only once every 18.6 years. During a major lunar standstill, the tilts of both the Earth and the moon are at their maximum, causing the moon to rise and set at its highest and lowest points in its orbital cycle. To fully appreciate the grandeur of this event, consider the ancient sites of Stonehenge, Kalanish, and Newgrange. These prehistoric monuments are thought to be aligned with the points of moonrise and moonset during such standstills, indicating the historical significance and awe that this event has invoked in humanity for millennia. The next standstill, at its most extreme, will be around the equinoxes in September 2024 and March 2025. For those eager to witness this spectacle, the best times include moonrise at sunset and moonset at sunrise, especially during a full moon. No need for elaborate equipment, just a clear view of the horizon will suffice to observe the moon's dramatic paths. So mark your calendars and be sure to look up. The lunar sky is about to put on a show you won't want to miss.The European Space Agency has recently unveiled a breathtaking image of Mars' Marth Vallis region, highlighting the planet's complex and metallic beauty. This newly captured scene showcases landscapes rich in iron, magnesium, and aluminum, creating a vibrant and rust-colored spectacle that tells a story billions of years in the making. Marth Vallis is particularly significant because it bears evidence of ancient water flow. The region's deeply eroded valleys and mineral-rich layers suggest that liquid water once roamed these Martian plains, potentially creating habitable conditions. This discovery continues to intrigue scientists as understanding the history of water on Mars is crucial for piecing together the planet's potential for supporting life. With ongoing studies and future missions focused on similar areas, we inch closer to unlocking the mysteries of the red planet's wet past and its capacity to host life.A new study has quantified the alarming extent of pollution caused by defunct Internet satellites. Thousands of satellites have been deployed into mega constellations to meet the growing global demand for Internet services. However, when these satellites reach the end of their operational life and re-enter Earth's atmosphere, they disintegrate and release aluminum oxide particles that erode the ozone layer. This phenomenon poses a significant threat to the years of progress made in ozone recovery. The 1987 Montreal Protocol successfully curbed the emission of ozone-depleting substances like CFCs, leading to a shrinking ozone hole over Antarctica, with full recovery expected within the next few decades. But now the unexpected increase in aluminum oxide pollution could derail this positive trend. The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, shows that aluminum oxide particles initiate chemical reactions between ozone and chlorine, leading to sustained ozone depletion. Alarmingly, the number of aluminum oxide particles in the atmosphere has surged eightfold from 2016 to 2022. This spike is set to continue as companies like SpaceX and Amazon plan to launch thousands more satellites. The ongoing and upcoming mega constellations are estimated to significantly elevate aluminum levels in the mesosphere, thereby posing a long-term threat to the stratospheric ozone layer, which shields us from harmful UV radiation. The researchers emphasize the need for immediate attention to this growing issue, advocating for sustainable practices to limit satellite-driven ozone depletion. The results underline the importance of balancing technological advancement with environmental stewardship to ensure our atmosphere remains protective for generations to come.Titan, Saturn's largest moon, features active lakes and seas filled with liquid methane and ethane. These otherworldly bodies of liquid are not only visually compelling but also tell a story of relentless geological activity. Recent simulations by MIT researchers have shed light on how waves might be eroding Titan's coastlines, radically altering our understanding of this mysterious moon. By modeling terrestrial erosion processes and applying them to Titan's unique environment, the researchers determined that wave activity is likely responsible for shaping the moon's shores. This means that shorelines on Titan resemble those formed by waves here on Earth, suggesting a dynamic interplay between the liquid bodies and the wind-driven waves. These discoveries offer invaluable insights into Titan's climate, helping scientists better understand its geological history and atmospheric conditions. If winds are strong enough to drive these waves, they could reveal secrets about Titan's weather patterns and even its potential to support some form of prebiotic chemistry.A groundbreaking study reveals that supermassive black holes are generating powerful cosmic winds, capable of accelerating gas to astonishing speeds of over 10,000 miles/second. These black hole-induced winds don't just ripple through their galaxies, they fundamentally reshape them by either fueling or stifling star formation. These powerful winds can have a dramatic effect on the galaxy's evolution. Imagine a quasar, a supermassive black hole surrounded by a disk of matter being pulled in by the black hole's gravitational force. The friction created as this matter spirals inward heats the disk, emitting intense radiation that can propel gas at unimaginable speeds. This process isn't merely a cosmic spectacle; it serves a critical function in the galactic environment. Depending on the circumstances, these winds can compress gas, leading to the birth of new stars or expel the gas, preventing star formation altogether. Researchers now have a clearer understanding of how these fascinating mechanisms work, thanks to long-term observational data that captured these accelerating gases in action. This transformational insight adds another piece to the puzzle of how black holes interact with and shape their host galaxies, emphasizing the profound impact these cosmic phenomena have on the universe.SpaceX is busy at Starbase preparing for its fifth flight by upgrading its infrastructure, including new office buildings and the construction of a second tower. Recently, Ship 26 conducted its first multi-engine static fire test at the site, marking a significant milestone. These enhancements, which also involve a new test stand, improved tank farms, and the development of Megabay Two, are designed to expedite vehicle testing and future launches. With a new parking garage and updated launch mount systems in place, SpaceX aims to ensure quicker turnarounds and increased safety for its employees and operations. These ongoing upgrades showcase SpaceX's unwavering commitment to pushing the boundaries of space exploration and innovation. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at https://www.astronomydaily.io for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Anna, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all. https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/
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    S03E84 Plus: NASA's Spacewalk Halt & SpaceX's Launch Marathon

    25 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy Daily, your daily dose of celestial wonder and cosmic news. I'm Anna, your host, and I'm thrilled to take you on today's journey through the fascinating world of astronomy. In our podcast, we bring you the latest updates, expert insights, and detailed commentary on everything happening beyond our planet. Today we've got an exciting lineup of stories that will captivate both seasoned astronomers and curious newcomers alike. We'll start with NASA's recent decision to cancel a spacewalk again due to a coolant leak. What happened, why it's significant and what it means for future missions. Then we'll dive into a busy week of launches by SpaceX and JAXA, highlighting their challenges and achievements. We'll also explore China's Chang'e-6 mission, returning with groundbreaking samples from the moon's far side. We'll examine the close approach of two large asteroids as they fly by Earth and talk about why it's crucial to enhance our detection systems. Ever wondered why some planets have moons while others don't? We'll delve into the science behind it, and later we'll uncover the mystery behind a massive aurora in the arctic sky. So sit back, relax, and let's embark on this cosmic journey together. 00:00 Welcome to Astronomy Daily, your daily dose of celestial wonder and cosmic news 01:10 NASA calls off a spacewalk due to a leak in an astronaut spacesuit 03:12 After delays due to tropical storm Alberto, SpaceX has several upcoming launches scheduled 05:09 Japan gearing up for third launch attempt of h three rocket on June 30 06:18 The Chang'e six mission is set to return with samples from the far side 08:28 Two large asteroids will pass by Earth this week coinciding with Asteroid day 10:47 Understanding why planets have moons or don't is a complex puzzle 13:51 December 2022 aurora was unusually smooth and broad 16:26 Today's Episode Wrap https://www.astronomydaily.io https://www.bitesz.com
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    S03E83 Plus: NASA Sued Over Space Junk & Gamma Ray Burst Hunt

    24 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy AstroDailyPod! I'm your host, Steve Dunkley, bringing you the latest cosmic updates for 24 June 2024. Today, we delve into a star on the brink of explosion, a stranded spacecraft, and the ongoing search for Planet Nine. We'll also explore new satellite constellations aiding in firefighting, a joint Chinese-French satellite mission, and a family suing NASA over space debris. Plus, we look at racing drones testing spacecraft control systems. Let's dive in!- **NASA Sued Over Space Junk**: An American family is claiming over $80,000 from NASA after space debris crashed into their Florida home. The debris, part of a cargo pallet from the ISS, caused significant damage but fortunately no injuries. NASA's response could set a precedent for future claims.- **Chinese-French Satellite Mission**: A joint mission between China and France has launched the Space Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) to study gamma ray bursts, the universe's mightiest explosions. This collaboration aims to unravel mysteries of the cosmos and enhance our understanding of the universe's history.- **Boeing Starliner Delayed Again**: NASA has delayed the return of the Boeing Starliner from the ISS to review thruster malfunctions and helium leaks. The mission, initially set for June 26, will be rescheduled to ensure safety and thorough data analysis.- **Impending Nova Event**: The star T Coronae Borealis, part of a binary system, is set to undergo a nova event visible from Earth. This rare cosmic event offers a unique opportunity for both professional and amateur astronomers to observe and study.- **Racing Drones for Spacecraft Control**: Researchers at Delft University are using racing drones to test neural network-based AI control systems for future space missions. This innovative approach aims to enhance spacecraft autonomy and efficiency in unpredictable space environments.For an astronomical experience, visit our website at [astronomydaily.io](https://www.astronomydaily.io) for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Steve, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all!**Support**:This podcast is better with your support:[https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/](https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/)[www.bitesz.com](https://www.bitesz.com/)**Sponsors**:[www.bitesz.com/nordpass](https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass)[https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/]
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    S03E82 Plus: Boeing's Starliner Delay (Again) & Saturn's Seasonal Mysteries

    22 GIU 2024 · Welcome to Astronomy Daily. I'm your host, Anna, and today we've got an exciting lineup of space news you won't want to miss. From the latest updates on Boeing's Starliner mission to groundbreaking discoveries about our galaxy's star clusters and intriguing insights into changes occurring within Earth's inner core. We've also got news on Virgin Galactic's new commercial astronaut crew, the completion of the Ariane 6 rocket's final rehearsal, and revelations from NASA's Cassini spacecraft about Saturn's seasonal heat and storms. So sit back, relax, and let's dive into the cosmos. Chapters- Boeing's Starliner Mission Delay: The first astronaut mission of Boeing's Starliner capsule has been delayed until at least July 2. Originally set to undock from the International Space Station on June 26, the mission has been extended to allow NASA and Boeing more time to assess several issues that have emerged. - Origins of Star Clusters: Astronomers from the University of Vienna have traced the origins of nearby star clusters to three primary star-forming regions in our Milky Way galaxy. These regions have been sites of massive star formation and subsequent supernova explosions. - Earth's Inner Core Slowing Down: Since around 2010, researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that Earth's inner core has been slowing down. This phenomenon, which alters the length of our days by fractions of a second, offers intriguing insights into the planet's internal dynamics. - Virgin Galactic's New Commercial Astronaut Crew: Virgin Galactic has revealed a new commercial astronaut crew for its next-generation delta class planes, which are slated to commence flights in 2026. This pioneering crew features three notable members: past Virgin Galactic astronaut Kelly Girardi, Canadian Shawna Pandya, and Ireland's Nora Patton. - Ariane 6 Rocket's Final Rehearsal: The first Ariane 6 rocket has successfully completed its final wet dress rehearsal, marking an important milestone before its first skyward journey. This crucial test took place at Europe's spaceport in French Guiana. - NASA's Cassini Spacecraft Findings: NASA's Cassini spacecraft has provided us with groundbreaking data that reveals Saturn emits heat in varying amounts depending on its seasons. This fascinating discovery outlines that Saturn fluctuates in the amount of heat it radiates into space. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at astronomydaily.io for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Anna, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all! Support:This podcast is better with your support: https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/support/ https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/
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    S03E81 Plus: NASA's Asteroid Defense & Marsquake Water Discovery

    22 GIU 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with today's episode of Astronomy Daily - The Podcast, where your host, Anna, brings you the latest cosmic updates. We'll delve into NASA's latest asteroid impact exercise, groundbreaking research on Martian water detection, DARPA's new quantum laser project, intriguing air samples gathered by Perseverance, and celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope's 21st anniversary with stunning images. Plus, we'll look at recent research focusing on heart failure in space. Let's dive right in.NASA recently released a summary of the fifth biennial planetary defense interagency tabletop exercise, aimed at exploring our preparedness for potential asteroid threats. Organized by NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office in partnership with FEMA and the US Department of State Office of Space Affairs, this exercise aimed to assess and enhance our national response capabilities. Despite having no significant asteroid impact threats on the horizon, these hypothetical exercises are invaluable, providing insights into potential risks and response strategies for varying scenarios. This year's exercise involved a newly identified asteroid with a 72% chance of hitting Earth in 14 years. Nearly 100 representatives from US government agencies and international collaborators convened at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland for the exercise. The next steps include publishing a complete after-action report detailing the identified strengths and gaps and offering recommendations for improvement.In an exciting development, researchers believe that marsquakes could offer a new method for detecting liquid water deep underground on Mars. This intriguing possibility lies in the unique electromagnetic signals these quakes produce as they traverse Mars' subsurface. Traditional methods, such as ground-penetrating radar used on Earth, aren't effective at the depths where water might exist on Mars. But marsquakes could change that. Researchers at Penn State have modeled the Martian subsurface, incorporating potential aquifers to test the seismoelectric method. Their results are promising. By identifying these unique seismic signals, they could map hidden aquifers, providing critical insights into the presence and properties of water on Mars today.Next, we dive into an exciting breakthrough in laser technology. Funded by DARPA, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, they're investing in a game-changing project to develop a quantum laser that uses entangled photons, promising better precision over long distances and in adverse conditions. Traditional lasers are remarkable tools already crucial in various domains, but they are not without limitations. This is where the new quantum laser comes in, utilizing quantum entanglement to pair photons together, creating photonic dimers. This means that applications such as military surveillance, secure communications, and high-precision mapping could see significant performance improvements.Scientists are eagerly anticipating the return of air samples collected by NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. These samples, gathered in titanium tubes alongside rock and regolith, are providing a golden opportunity to delve deeper into the Martian atmosphere and its composition as part of the Mars Sample Return campaign. These 24 samples will be analyzed to uncover secrets about the planet's atmospheric history and to determine the presence of trace gases that may have been consistent since Mars' ancient past. Understanding this interaction is pivotal, as it could reveal how much water vapor resides near the Martian surface. Such knowledge can illuminate the mysterious ways in which Mars' water cycle has evolved over time.To celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope's 21st anniversary, astronomers pointed Hubble's eye at a striking cosmic duo. Known as Arp 273, this pair of interacting galaxies presents a breathtaking sight. The larger galaxy, UGC 1810, has a disk that has been twisted into a rose-like shape. This stunning distortion is caused by the gravitational tidal forces exerted by its companion, UGC 1813. The image, a composite of observations from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, reveals the intricate beauty and complex dance of these celestial bodies, showcasing the achievements of Hubble and its ongoing contributions to our understanding of the universe.As commercial space travel becomes more accessible, researchers are delving into how spaceflight impacts individuals with underlying health conditions, especially heart failure. Recent studies have focused on developing computational models to predict how microgravity affects these individuals. Heart failure affects over 100 million people globally and is generally categorized into two types. Both types present unique challenges in a microgravity environment, underscoring the need for carefully tailored measures to protect the health of space tourists. Researchers have used advanced computational models to simulate these conditions and predict outcomes with a high degree of accuracy. These models allow scientists to anticipate the specific cardiovascular challenges faced by heart failure patients in space.That wraps up today's episode of Astronomy Daily. Be sure to visit our website at https://www.astronomydaily.io for regularly updated news, and to sign up for our newsletter. Don't forget to follow us on social media by searching for @AstroDailyPod on YouTube Music, X, TikTok, and Facebook. And please subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, or wherever you get your podcasts. This is Anna saying thank you for tuning in, and remember to keep looking up.
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    S03E80 Plus: Lunar Standstill Spectacle & Mars' Metallic Marvels

    20 GIU 2024 · Embark on a celestial journey with today's episode of Astronomy Daily - The Podcast, where your host, Anna, brings you the latest cosmic updates. We'll explore the first major lunar standstill in 18 years, unveiling a breathtaking celestial moment you won't want to miss. Next, we'll dive into the rich, metallic landscapes of Mars, painting a vivid picture of the red planet's geological marvels. We'll also tackle the unsettling reality of space junk and its impact on Earth's ozone layer, a concern growing with the expansion of satellite mega constellations. Shifting our gaze to Saturn's moon Titan, we'll uncover how wave activity might be shaping its mysterious coastlines. Finally, we'll explore how cosmic winds driven by supermassive black holes can alter the very fabric of galaxies. And to round it all off, we'll get an update on the latest developments at SpaceX's Starbase. So let's dive right in.This year marks a truly remarkable celestial event, the first major lunar standstill since 2006. This fascinating phenomenon will see the moon rising and setting at its most extreme points on the horizon. For sky watchers, this is a rare treat, occurring only once every 18.6 years. During a major lunar standstill, the tilts of both the Earth and the moon are at their maximum, causing the moon to rise and set at its highest and lowest points in its orbital cycle. To fully appreciate the grandeur of this event, consider the ancient sites of Stonehenge, Kalanish, and Newgrange. These prehistoric monuments are thought to be aligned with the points of moonrise and moonset during such standstills, indicating the historical significance and awe that this event has invoked in humanity for millennia. The next standstill, at its most extreme, will be around the equinoxes in September 2024 and March 2025. For those eager to witness this spectacle, the best times include moonrise at sunset and moonset at sunrise, especially during a full moon. No need for elaborate equipment, just a clear view of the horizon will suffice to observe the moon's dramatic paths. So mark your calendars and be sure to look up. The lunar sky is about to put on a show you won't want to miss.The European Space Agency has recently unveiled a breathtaking image of Mars' Marth Vallis region, highlighting the planet's complex and metallic beauty. This newly captured scene showcases landscapes rich in iron, magnesium, and aluminum, creating a vibrant and rust-colored spectacle that tells a story billions of years in the making. Marth Vallis is particularly significant because it bears evidence of ancient water flow. The region's deeply eroded valleys and mineral-rich layers suggest that liquid water once roamed these Martian plains, potentially creating habitable conditions. This discovery continues to intrigue scientists as understanding the history of water on Mars is crucial for piecing together the planet's potential for supporting life. With ongoing studies and future missions focused on similar areas, we inch closer to unlocking the mysteries of the red planet's wet past and its capacity to host life.A new study has quantified the alarming extent of pollution caused by defunct Internet satellites. Thousands of satellites have been deployed into mega constellations to meet the growing global demand for Internet services. However, when these satellites reach the end of their operational life and re-enter Earth's atmosphere, they disintegrate and release aluminum oxide particles that erode the ozone layer. This phenomenon poses a significant threat to the years of progress made in ozone recovery. The 1987 Montreal Protocol successfully curbed the emission of ozone-depleting substances like CFCs, leading to a shrinking ozone hole over Antarctica, with full recovery expected within the next few decades. But now the unexpected increase in aluminum oxide pollution could derail this positive trend. The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, shows that aluminum oxide particles initiate chemical reactions between ozone and chlorine, leading to sustained ozone depletion. Alarmingly, the number of aluminum oxide particles in the atmosphere has surged eightfold from 2016 to 2022. This spike is set to continue as companies like SpaceX and Amazon plan to launch thousands more satellites. The ongoing and upcoming mega constellations are estimated to significantly elevate aluminum levels in the mesosphere, thereby posing a long-term threat to the stratospheric ozone layer, which shields us from harmful UV radiation. The researchers emphasize the need for immediate attention to this growing issue, advocating for sustainable practices to limit satellite-driven ozone depletion. The results underline the importance of balancing technological advancement with environmental stewardship to ensure our atmosphere remains protective for generations to come.Titan, Saturn's largest moon, features active lakes and seas filled with liquid methane and ethane. These otherworldly bodies of liquid are not only visually compelling but also tell a story of relentless geological activity. Recent simulations by MIT researchers have shed light on how waves might be eroding Titan's coastlines, radically altering our understanding of this mysterious moon. By modeling terrestrial erosion processes and applying them to Titan's unique environment, the researchers determined that wave activity is likely responsible for shaping the moon's shores. This means that shorelines on Titan resemble those formed by waves here on Earth, suggesting a dynamic interplay between the liquid bodies and the wind-driven waves. These discoveries offer invaluable insights into Titan's climate, helping scientists better understand its geological history and atmospheric conditions. If winds are strong enough to drive these waves, they could reveal secrets about Titan's weather patterns and even its potential to support some form of prebiotic chemistry.A groundbreaking study reveals that supermassive black holes are generating powerful cosmic winds, capable of accelerating gas to astonishing speeds of over 10,000 miles/second. These black hole-induced winds don't just ripple through their galaxies, they fundamentally reshape them by either fueling or stifling star formation. These powerful winds can have a dramatic effect on the galaxy's evolution. Imagine a quasar, a supermassive black hole surrounded by a disk of matter being pulled in by the black hole's gravitational force. The friction created as this matter spirals inward heats the disk, emitting intense radiation that can propel gas at unimaginable speeds. This process isn't merely a cosmic spectacle; it serves a critical function in the galactic environment. Depending on the circumstances, these winds can compress gas, leading to the birth of new stars or expel the gas, preventing star formation altogether. Researchers now have a clearer understanding of how these fascinating mechanisms work, thanks to long-term observational data that captured these accelerating gases in action. This transformational insight adds another piece to the puzzle of how black holes interact with and shape their host galaxies, emphasizing the profound impact these cosmic phenomena have on the universe.SpaceX is busy at Starbase preparing for its fifth flight by upgrading its infrastructure, including new office buildings and the construction of a second tower. Recently, Ship 26 conducted its first multi-engine static fire test at the site, marking a significant milestone. These enhancements, which also involve a new test stand, improved tank farms, and the development of Megabay Two, are designed to expedite vehicle testing and future launches. With a new parking garage and updated launch mount systems in place, SpaceX aims to ensure quicker turnarounds and increased safety for its employees and operations. These ongoing upgrades showcase SpaceX's unwavering commitment to pushing the boundaries of space exploration and innovation. For an astronomical experience, visit our website at https://www.astronomydaily.io for the latest news, sign up for our free newsletter, and check out exclusive sponsor deals. Connect with us on YouTube, TikTok, X, and Facebook via @AstroDailyPod for engaging discussions with fellow space aficionados. This is Anna, reminding you to keep your gaze fixed on the heavens. Until our next stellar episode, let the cosmos ignite your curiosity and wonder. Clear skies and cosmic discoveries to all. https://www.bitesz.com/ Sponsors: https://www.bitesz.com/nordpass https://www.bitesz.com/show/astronomy-daily-the-podcast/sponsors/